Miller receives Congressional Bronze Medal

  • Harrison Miller (third from left) receives the Congressional Bronze Medal Award from Rep. Joe Wilson. Also pictured are Margaret and Robert Miller (Harrison’s aunt and uncle), Nathaniel and Lily Miller (his parents), and Bernice Dix (his grandmother).

A Barnwell teen has been awarded the Congressional Bronze Medal Award.

Harrison Miller, an eleventh grader at Barnwell High School, received the award on August 8 from U.S. Rep. Joe Wilson during a presentation in front of the Barnwell County Courthouse.

“I am so grateful to see Harrison’s passion for community service and teamwork. He serves as an excellent example for his peers, and I know he will only continue to achieve amazing accomplishments in his future,” said Wilson, whose District 2 includes Barnwell County.

Founded in 1979, the Congressional Award recognizes young Americans (ages 14 to 23) for their achievements in community service, physical fitness, exploration, and personal development. “Earning the Congressional award is a fun and interesting way to get more involved in something you already enjoy or something you’d like to try for the first time,” according to www.congressionalaward.org.

To earn the award, Miller performed 200 hours of community service, including working with the YMCA HeadStart program at Litchfield Apartments in Barnwell. “I helped the kids get prepared for school,” he said.

“Harrison Miller has worked diligently to provide a safe place for children after school by supplying them with books and games, and also served as the recording secretary of his church,” said Wilson.

Miller has learned the importance of teamwork and leadership through Boy Scouts in Troop 392 where he earned the rank of Eagle Scout, as well as participating in debate and sports at school.

In addition to community service, Miller had to complete physical fitness hours and work on personal development. For the exploration part, he went on a two-day overnight trip to an old African village in Beaufort, various museums, James Island and an old slave market.

“It’s always good to try to embrace a new culture and widen horizons,” said Miller, who had to write about his experiences.

Miller started the process for the award two years ago after his cousin in Washington, D.C. told him about the award.

“You move at your own pace – on your own or with your friends. This is not an award for past accomplishments. Instead, you are honored for achieving your own challenging goals after registering for the program,” according to the website.

Now that he has earned the bronze medal, Miller said he wants to keep going until he earns gold. He also encourages other teens to earn the award.